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Old 12-24-2018, 11:06 AM
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FoxerNOpro1966 FoxerNOpro1966 is offline
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Default Opinions please: Coyotes and calves

I spoke with one of my cattle farmers Sunday. I stopped to show him and his son who manages the property some pics of the coyote I killed there last Tuesday. He was very happy and wants me to get a few more.

He told me something the PA game commission told him last year. He asked them if the coyotes pose a risk to his cattle and here is what they told him.

According to my farmers they were told if the coyote pack has their farm as part of their territory and hasn't bothered any of his cattle and calves so far then leave them alone. If you kill them then other coyotes will take over the territory AND the new ones MIGHT be the kind that DO kill calves.

Does anyone agree or disagree with that? Me personally I am not sure I can believe that. The farmer still wants a few more taken out of the population but any thoughts on what the PA game commission told him?
Thanks,
Scott
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:29 AM
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Sonny Pruitt Sonny Pruitt is offline
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I agree completely. Shocking huh?

A few years ago I corresponded with a Wildlife Biologist PhD, by the name of Numi Mitchell. She conducted an extensive study of coyotes over several years in the Narragansett Bay area. GPS collars were used and 24/7 tracking done by satellite. She proved beyond a doubt how they interacted with humans in the Rhode Island area especially around Jamestown. She hired professional trappers for her studies in tagging and recollaring coyotes. It proved their territorial boundaries did exist and how they honor them. She had several packs that were in and around farms and cattle, calves constantly and never partook of the buffet. Yet she had another farmer who actually taught her coyotes to eat sheep, eventually killing and eating them. He established a bone yard of dead animals, which in turn the coyotes took part in cleaning up and eventually taking some off the hoof so to speak. Numi's study proved exactly what the PA Game Commission told your farmer. For several years her pack that lived with cattle passively were killed out by hunters and traffic etc. She watched the new transient coyotes move in to her older pack's territory and assume the watch and ownership. Some of them had come from the pack that the farmer had taught to eat livestock. It was a great study and she sent me alot of it on DVD, some of her seminars etc. Don't get me wrong, this girl was NOT opposed to trapping and hunting of coyotes. She just loved studying them, she had a pile of beautiful fur.

But yes is the answer to your question, his information is correct. Hope this helps. Good hunting

Last edited by Sonny Pruitt; 12-24-2018 at 12:52 PM.
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:34 AM
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There was so much information in the study that I could not possibly relay it all here. She had lots of rich people who lived in the area and thought feeding the wildlife was neat to see them in and around their yards, until Fluffy came up missing. Google her Narragansett Bay Coyote Study and see if it turns up for you. She was a cool chick. Don't tell her I said that.
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Old 12-24-2018, 02:13 PM
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XNAVYORDIE XNAVYORDIE is offline
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I agree with Sonny and the DNR. I have heard the same. In fact they (DNR) spoke about it when I attended Hunter Safety Course last year with my Son. Another interesting thing that was brought up is you can't really "thin" them out......when the pack begins to "thin" nature takes it's course and litters of pups increase. I recall reading about that as well...; )

You may want to ask when calving season is.....that is typically when the yotes like to be around cattle...they have a taste for the afterbirth...

http://theconservationagency.org/nar...-coyote-study/

Last edited by XNAVYORDIE; 12-24-2018 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 12-24-2018, 02:47 PM
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Afterbirth and especially cow paddies from calves who are feeding on nothing but Momma's milk. They will pass up alot of food sources for a manure paddy off of a calf. Seriously. My family back in Missouri raises beef cattle. You will see this all the time. So many nutrients that pass unused.

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Old 12-24-2018, 04:27 PM
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XNAVYORDIE XNAVYORDIE is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny Pruitt View Post
Afterbirth and especially cow paddies from calves who are feeding on nothing but Momma's milk. They will pass up alot of food sources for a manure paddy off of a calf. Seriously. My family back in Missouri raises beef cattle. You will see this all the time. So many nutrients that pass unused.

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I knew there was a reason why I didn't care for yote jerky.....; )
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Old 12-24-2018, 07:44 PM
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I agree with her findings. Coyotes are just as interesting to study and read about as they are to hunt.
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny Pruitt View Post
I agree completely. Shocking huh?

A few years ago I corresponded with a Wildlife Biologist PhD, by the name of Numi Mitchell. She conducted an extensive study of coyotes over several years in the Narragansett Bay area. GPS collars were used and 24/7 tracking done by satellite. She proved beyond a doubt how they interacted with humans in the Rhode Island area especially around Jamestown. She hired professional trappers for her studies in tagging and recollaring coyotes. It proved their territorial boundaries did exist and how they honor them. She had several packs that were in and around farms and cattle, calves constantly and never partook of the buffet. Yet she had another farmer who actually taught her coyotes to eat sheep, eventually killing and eating them. He established a bone yard of dead animals, which in turn the coyotes took part in cleaning up and eventually taking some off the hoof so to speak. Numi's study proved exactly what the PA Game Commission told your farmer. For several years her pack that lived with cattle passively were killed out by hunters and traffic etc. She watched the new transient coyotes move in to her older pack's territory and assume the watch and ownership. Some of them had come from the pack that the farmer had taught to eat livestock. It was a great study and she sent me alot of it on DVD, some of her seminars etc. Don't get me wrong, this girl was NOT opposed to trapping and hunting of coyotes. She just loved studying them, she had a pile of beautiful fur.

But yes is the answer to your question, his information is correct. Hope this helps. Good hunting
Honestly YES I was surprised and shocked! But I like having a better understanding so this is great information Sonny thank you.

After reading this and thinking about it I can see that it makes sense. Yet the one question that remains (and maybe after I read Numi's study - I have it pulled up now - I'll have an answer) is what comes first the chicken or the egg?

The coyote that has killed a calf and then gets killed by a hunter/farmer offering up new territory for a calf killer? OR a coyote that has been killed by a hunter/farmer before it kills any livestock and then a new coyotes moves in and kills the calf?

My question probably doesn't make much sense, only in my head. I just feel that the same scenario in the OPPOSITE way could also come about. You kill a coyote, whether it has killed a calf or not, and another coyote can move in that DOES kill calves but couldn't also another coyote move in that DOESN'T kill calves? I think there would be a lot of variables.

It seems to be a revolving door of unknowns. I know some dogs that like killing groundhogs and I know some dogs that have no interest in them. If I get rid of a dog that doesn't kill any groundhogs and get a new dog. chances are 50/50 I'll get a new dog that kills em and 50/50 I'll get a new dog that won't.

I'll read her study and maybe find some other tidbits I can chew on lol.
As always I appreciate all the experience found on this forum. Thanks all,
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  #9  
Old 12-26-2018, 06:42 PM
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Sonny Pruitt Sonny Pruitt is offline
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You're right, there are many variable to this equation. Good question and anything is possible as far as the new coyote moving in.

I too, do enjoy reading the information that is assemble here at times. YOu gotta be able to sort through the chafe at times though. LOL
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Old 12-27-2018, 12:34 AM
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Terry B Terry B is offline
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Never read any studies but strictly speaking from experience, In my neck of the woods they don't bother cattle. They wont even eat the dead ones that my buddy puts out on his compost pile. I have in the last 2 years had bait piles established for Yotes. They would walk past a dead calf to feed on a roadkill deer. But the would find the bones of decomposed cows in the compost piles and drag them off and chew on them like a domestic dog would gnaw on a bone.
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