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Old 01-14-2019, 08:06 PM
Lunarday358 Lunarday358 is offline
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Default Successful setups

I've been trying to get my first coyote for several years now but just cant seem to make it happen. I believe my biggest weakness is my setups. I've tried looking up some setup info online but am still having trouble figuring things out. I hunt small agricultural areas in southwestern ny and northwestern pa and was hoping some guys who hunt similar areas could post some pictures or diagrams of their setups including wind direction, hunter and call placement, terrain features and coyote approach. Thanks in advance for any help.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:01 PM
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Weasel Weasel is offline
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I've never read one, but I've read good things about Andrew Lewand's books. I believe he might hunt similar, if not the same areas. He's also a member here.
Here is a link to his page: www.barkatthemooncoyoteclub.com
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Last edited by Weasel; 01-14-2019 at 09:05 PM.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:07 PM
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Sonny Pruitt Sonny Pruitt is offline
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I am not good at posting diagrams or patching in Google Earth maps, but I can give you some "ideas to think about." I've killed a few in my time.

Everyone says setup with the wind in your face. I try to never do that, I hate looking behind me.

I like a crosswind, left to right or vice versa. Set the caller upwind, or into the wind so when they come downwind of the sound they will either be in front of you or off to one side crossing in front of you to go towards the caller.

Always sit where you have some elevation if possible, the slightest rise is helpful.

Learn to howl or use the howls on the caller to locate before the hunt ever begins. Early morning, or just after dark to locate do some locating. No sense in calling if they ain't there. Similar to Spring Gobbler, locate first then move to them "WITH STEALTH"

If you are day time hunting, always have the sun on them not you, sit in the shade. That white chest shows up good when the sun hits it.

My best results have come using something similar to Randy Anderson's three stages or phases of calling. First phase is a lone howl, female, nonaggressive Sore Howl, or a Yodel Howl a few times, then incorporate some silence for a few minutes, then let them know you are eating their food supply(rabbit distress of some type) then more silence. Then some pup screams fused together with a coyote fight or FoxPro's Pup Distress #3. Modify this to your own liking. But it works.

Hope this will help you

Last edited by Sonny Pruitt; 01-14-2019 at 09:09 PM.
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:32 PM
bweigel25 bweigel25 is offline
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A few things i have learned over the years is try to setup in a crosswind, try best to sut in a shadowy area. Don't set the call directly in front of you, when a coyote comes in he will be focused in the direction of the call, it gives you a little more room for error when positioning rifle for a shot. Sit as still as possible i have had coyotes bust me at 300 yards or so taking a glove off. Based on what the terrain and the setup is like, keep the call volume low at the beginning, then slowly ramp up the volume after every sequence. Most of this stuff is trial and error, there is no good perfect setup. I have walked along way and sat a lot of stands and called in nothing. Persistence is key, when you call one in remember the things you did, everytime you call one in you will get a little smarter on what to do and what not to do. It's always a challenge, that is why I think I love this sport so much. Don't give up and persistence is key, put in the extra effort and it will pay off.
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Old 01-24-2019, 04:44 PM
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Possumal Possumal is offline
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If you have scouted the areas you hunt, you should have already picked some spots for morning stands, evening stands, etc.. If you plan your route correctly, you can drop off your ecaller before you get to your sit down spot. Clearing out briars and the like when you scout saves you valuable time when the fun time arrives. You want the coyote to come in downwind of the ecaller but not downwind of you. That takes a little thinking but mostly common sense. As already mentioned, elevation for your sit down spot can help a bunch.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:44 PM
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Sonny Pruitt Sonny Pruitt is offline
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To further elaborate on AL's comments, I carry a pair of pruning shears in my FoxPro bag, so handy in clearing up a sit down spot or knocking the lower branches off a pine for a back rest (which is super important for accuracy)

Just sayin' it is the little things that help. Us old guys know this from all our mistakes.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:49 AM
carl carl is offline
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Michael Huff has a new one out that might be good for you. I have a copy, but have not read it yet. It's called Master Coyote Hunting.

Last edited by carl; 01-25-2019 at 10:52 AM.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:52 AM
carl carl is offline
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https://www.amazon.com/Master-Coyote.../dp/172732479X
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Old 01-26-2019, 03:22 AM
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Yeah Sonny, I have been carrying a pair of ratchet shears for years, enabling me to cut pretty good sized limbs silently. I also have a Stanley folding saw that I seldom use but it allows me to cut down a good sized sapling if needed. Nothing like making a hard job easy.
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