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Feline Hunting No, not the place for housecats. This is for the "other"cats, including bobcats and mountain lions (the BIG cats).

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  #11  
Old 01-03-2019, 08:10 PM
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SWAMPBUCK10PT SWAMPBUCK10PT is offline
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Thanks for all the Cat tips Sonny


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CALL'EM THEY'LL COME === CAUTION!!!YOU HAVE ENTERED "THEE" KILL ZONE
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2019, 08:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWAMPBUCK10PT View Post
Thanks for all the Cat tips Sonny


svb
Hope it helps someone out in getting one. Thank you
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  #13  
Old 01-10-2019, 01:07 PM
Boyd Heaton Boyd Heaton is offline
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Default Who's Ready?

Bobcat hunting season in PA opens in a few days!!! Who's ready?
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:34 AM
spurlucky spurlucky is offline
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I have a couple questions for the cat killers here.
I have been told that mountain lions patrol a huge radius of land. 100 miles I was told (might be a bunch of hooey). If so, do Bobs have larger hunting tracts than coyotes?
Second, do Bobs have far less ability to use the wind for locating prey (or us)?

Thanks mentors,
Spurlucky
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  #15  
Old 01-12-2019, 09:39 AM
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Sonny Pruitt Sonny Pruitt is offline
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First of all, I know nothing about mountain lions.

In regards to a bobcat's territory or hunting tract. In my area I believe they are pretty small due to habitat and abundance of food supply. We have at least three cats(trail cameras data) using a core area of about three miles, small in comparison to a coyotes required range. Their ranging will increase during mating season, but it is not necessarily due to food demand.

I do not believe they use their nose to detect danger or in search of food. They are sight hunters and rely on their vision which is excellent at detecting movement, our's or a prey animal. My hunting partner and I have called them in from downwind and they never stuttered stepped a bit.

They are curious animals and will respond to some unbelievable calls that you would never suspect, such as fox distress and coyote vocals. Over the last two years, we have had three come into Platinum Gray Fox Pup when we were fox hunting. Curiosity kills cats, seriously. Calling bobcats is like calling coons. They won't normally travel a great distance to the call, get in close on one before calling (300 yds or less). Not hard to call, but hard to hunt or find.
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  #16  
Old 03-01-2019, 11:53 PM
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Now that bobcat season is over in most states, I thought I would bring this back to the top for more input from others. Please jump in there with your opinions and ideas.
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  #17  
Old 03-02-2019, 06:15 PM
Night Eyes Night Eyes is offline
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In my part of NY, their home range is large. Males cover approx. 136 square mile, Females approx. 33 square miles. Its best to look for them around swamps, beaver dams or rocky ledge type areas. Walking snow machine trails and logging roads right after a fresh snow fall to cut their tracks is probably the easiest way to locate them. Once found, set up quickly and start calling. They are not volume shy so crank it up. They love snow shoe rabbits, but mice, birds, squirrel, beaver and deer are also on the menu. Shots are usually close, a shotgun with a good load of buck shot or dead coyote load would be favored, followed by small caliber rifle. The use of decoys shine in these types of hunts. Killing them is not hard, but seeing them is. They can take over an hour to come in to the call. They sneak in and watch, sometimes they'll expose themselves. Other times they just leave, so patience is a must. In my opinion they are the ultimate trophy.
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  #18  
Old 03-04-2019, 05:36 PM
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Night Eyes

I am sure glad I don't live in your area. WOW! those are some huge ranges for bobcats. I've always assumed ( I know-I know) that their home range size was based on supply and demand of their favorite prey species. As I stated earlier in my thread that we have multiple bobcats living in a core area of about three miles near my home here in central Virginia. They are on camera way to often to travel very far from that area. This core area I am speaking of is a huge replanted pine cutover maybe a mile and half to two miles square, with adjacent river bottoms and swampy areas, as you mentioned.

Most of the studies I have read stated that male bobcat's travel areas were up to ten miles, in some cases. It stated most females maintain core areas of about three miles or so. With the male's area being larger, it usually overlaps numerous females areas. These studies were mostly done by PhD candidates pursuing Wildlife Biologist Doctorates here in the southern portion of the US, such as Mississppi, Alabama, Georgia Universities.

I just read an article in the Trapper&Predator Caller's Annual Yearbook (came in the mail today) written by Jack Spencer and he stated in high mountain desert areas where there is a significant absence of prey species that a Male bobcat could range up to almost ten miles. Again, food supply and demand driving the size of the range. He mentioned that he had ran them with hounds and they covered 5 to 10 miles. He had seen a study that confirmed his opinions on sizes of ranges via tracking collars placed on bobcats.

I am glad I don't live in your area with ranges that size, no wonder they are hard to come by. Food supply must be atrociously low up there. I would move south, quick. Good hunting.
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  #19  
Old 03-04-2019, 07:06 PM
Night Eyes Night Eyes is offline
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Sonny; Type in; Bobcat NYS DEC. The Catskill has a little more I think its 5 per hundred square miles. Lol. The males avg. 21 pounds the female 16. But they can get over 30lbs. That's why when I got one and it was a male at 27lbs. I was like OMG,OMG your getting mounted. So spending $650.00 for the mount didn't bother me in the least.
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  #20  
Old 03-04-2019, 09:26 PM
Kykiller Kykiller is offline
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Jeez, those numbers are rough Night Eyes. I am also glad I do not live up there. Where I am at in southeastern Kentucky, bobcats are very plentiful. I wouldn't know how to guess their home range, but it is way less than even 10 miles. Going out after a snow shows just how many cats we have down here. Old reclaimed strip mines have a decent amount of prey also, so that probably contributes to them being thick.
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