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  #1  
Old 08-17-2014, 11:44 AM
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Possumal Possumal is offline
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Default Something to teach newbies

Several times, I have witnessed something done by new hunters, right in view of the landowner, that represents a no no. If you are helping teach a newbie, emphasize how important it is to use gates, etc., the way they are intended. Never climb over a fence when you can walk a 100 yds or so and go through a gate. Never unwrap a candy bar and throw the wrapper on the ground when it would be easy to put it in your pocket and dispose of it later. Landowners are kind of funny about seeing someone they have given hunting permission to not exercising common sense in areas like this. Always teach the newbies to treat the landowner's property better than they would their own.
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Old 09-12-2014, 08:29 PM
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Brykespapa Brykespapa is offline
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100% True statement
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Old 09-14-2014, 03:00 PM
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The absolute worst experience I have ever had in this area was one day I took a young fellow out to one of my better coyote hunting farms. The land owner had just installed new gates on his property, and had obviously gone to a lot of trouble to do the job right. First thing my newbie did was swing on the main gate after he opened it for us to go through. I explained to him not to ever do that, and made him apologize to the owner. He took the criticism well, and the owner accepted the apology. The young man turned out to be a really good coyote hunter and is surely respectful of the owner's properties.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:45 PM
hilonesome hilonesome is offline
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That's where it helps to have grown up on a Farm/Ranch! nothing will get you whipped any harder or longer than climbing on a gate(if you MUST, climb over right at the Hinges) never climb over a fence(always crawl under or between the wires!
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Old 10-02-2014, 11:42 PM
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You are not likely to have to teach guys and gals brought up on farms or ranches. They learn pretty young about stuff like that. We have a lot of fences in this part of the country that you can't crawl under or through, so I teach newbies to climb over by a solid post, and if possible, don't climb over at all if a gate is a reasonable distance. You'll make a farmer happy if you teach this kind of stuff to people he gives permission to.
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Old 01-28-2016, 09:50 PM
Farmerj Farmerj is offline
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Default Fence climbers

We have 2 wood post about 12 inches or so apart in the middle of our fields, so when the grandkids or our neighbors grandkids come around they can just shimmy through no gates left open or fence climbers
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Old 01-30-2016, 11:12 PM
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Sounds like a good idea for any farmer who could put it to use. Are the posts close enough together to keep smaller animals like goats or sheep in?
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Old 01-31-2016, 07:23 PM
JMAC JMAC is offline
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One thing I have always done if offer to help with some chores; moving livestock, minor fence repair, helping shuttle equipment, etc.
Not only does it give you an insight into the farmers operation but small thing like that show your willingness to give back something.
It's gotten me into places I wouldn't have otherwise.
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Old 03-04-2016, 07:11 PM
Cranesville Hunter Cranesville Hunter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Possumal View Post
Several times, I have witnessed something done by new hunters, right in view of the landowner, that represents a no no. If you are helping teach a newbie, emphasize how important it is to use gates, etc., the way they are intended. Never climb over a fence when you can walk a 100 yds or so and go through a gate. Never unwrap a candy bar and throw the wrapper on the ground when it would be easy to put it in your pocket and dispose of it later. Landowners are kind of funny about seeing someone they have given hunting permission to not exercising common sense in areas like this. Always teach the newbies to treat the landowner's property better than they would their own.
Amen to that!
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  #10  
Old 03-06-2016, 10:38 AM
mitchm1 mitchm1 is offline
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JMAC
Is right on spot
I all ways try help with anything that they are doing that day or weekend
And sometimes even missing out on that days hunt! I try to show up several hours before I what to hunt.
But it has its rewards!


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